Jobs For Americans Overseas in the Philippines

OK. all I see is comments coming in here from people who “want jobs”. It seems no one has enough initiative to actually read the article, just splashing out their plea to anyone dumb enough to have a website.

If you want to find a job in the Philippines, here’s one place to look:

http://philfaqs.com/philippine-jobs-for-foreigners/

I don’t find people jobs and I discourage foreigners from seeking work here. The bottom line is there essentially are no jobs for you here.

I’m closing the comments becuase it’s just gone out of control. If people can’t bother to read, I can’t bother answering questions … the wrong questions. Sorry.

Some interesting thoughts about jobs, especially Philippines Jobs and other overseas jobs and Americans who can’t wait to take one:

Meet Sam Palmisano, bozo of the month. We diss IBM’s CEO for allowing some management numbskull to suggest that the thousands of Big Blue employees who have been fired recently should consider a move to India. And work really cheaply. Always helpful, IBM is willing to pitch in with moving costs and — in a particularly ironic twist — visa assistance.

Yeah, it’s hard to believe. But IBM put it in writing: “IBM has established Project Match to help you locate potential job opportunities in growth markets where your skills are in demand,” IBM says in an internal memo first obtained by InformationWeek. “Should you accept a position in one of these countries, IBM offers financial assistance to offset moving costs, provides immigration support, such as visa assistance, and other support to help ease the transition of an international move.” …



Maybe India’s not to your taste. No worries. IBM is also offering to send the newly unemployed to China, Brazil, the Czech Republic, Russia, South Africa, Nigeria, and the United Arab Emirates.

Pink slips at Big Blue
And in a touch that could only be called Dickensian, the IBM memo notes that Project Match, which sounds like a reality show on Bravo, is limited to “satisfactory performers who have been notified of separation from IBM U.S. or Canada and are willing to work on local terms and conditions.” Right. The worthy poor who don’t mind working for wages that are infinitely lower than what they’ve been paid in the United States.

(For those who are considering a move overseas, check out InfoWorld’s guide to offshoring yourself.) … Read the rest of the report and observe more of the author’s faulty logic here.

I’m not going to go a lot further down this line here … my only purpose was not to make fun of the IBM’ers (and of course

Americna jobs in the Philippines

I Want You (to move to India)

the people who depend upon them for jobs as well), but merely to point out that in today’s day and age, I think you people searching for a conventional j*o*b, especially with a larger, international company like IB are following the wrong career path.No matter how “high end” the company you might latch onto is (hint, you don’t get much higher end than IBM) the world today is different.  You do not have a job for life, and the management of the country, even if it is a company as “American as apple pie …. (hint: Again, what is more red, white and “Big” blue than IBM?),. the managers have the duty to keep the company alive for their stockholders and to turn a profit … keeping Americans employed is not one of the primary goals.

Here in the Philippines, although the recession has not yet had the income it has in the US, two major “flagship” foreign employers, Texas Instruments in Baguio and Intel in Cavite have recently closed.  TI (they make autopilot components for several Boeing commercial aircraft) may come back to life if Boeing’s business picks up, Intel is gone forever, they are consolidating operations from this plant and 5 others in Asia to a new facility in Vietnam.

If you want advice from me (and some of you don’t, but if you read this far you will get it anyway ;-), forget about trying to find a job in the Philippines, especially at a salary anywhere near what such jobs used to pay in the USA, and make yourself recession and layoff proof by starting your own business and being independent of grudgingly given charity like government handouts (oops, I mean bailout plans).

The younger you are and the more family responsibilities you have, the better off you will be if you break the charity chain now rather than when you may be forced to later, no matter if you live in the USA or live in the Philippines.



Comments

  1. michael says

    hi i am a retired army with 29 years experience in the army as HVAC i am wsondering if you have any jobs for me to the philippines because i am planning to go there on the january.. i can give you my resume so you can stream on my skills.. thank you god bless

  2. Rodolfo B. Garcia says

    Hi.Ihave been retired since last 2003 and am wondering if you you a job opening for me in the Phil.I am a retired military prio to my immigration here. Now that am A us Citizen.I can perform as Security or driver since I know places in Metro manila and suburbs.Thanks

  3. says

    Rudolfo, you’re welcome to comment here, but do take the time to look around and see what we are all about … this isn’t a ‘job service’ … although who knows, you might find someone here … I’m wondering, though, what do you think a driver/security officer ought to make here in the Philippines? Also, how long have you been in the US?

  4. Rodolfo B. Garcia says

    Hi Philly, been here in US for almost 19 years just asking for a job in Phil cause am already retired plus I want to relocate in PHIL. Thanks.

  5. michael says

    thanks philly for the advice.. i just want to be wiht my bride a gain soon… that is why im looking for a job in the philippines just temporarily while im waiting for my job in afghanistan and the immigration that will petitin her.. yap i seen that to they really dont know wha tis hvac and the way they do there buidings are way to different from us… god bless…

    • says

      God bless you too, Michael, and I hope your journey works out well. One suggestion … and I hope you take it as a suggestion and not a criticism … is your phraseology and opinions.

      When you post on public forums statements that “they don’t know what HVAC is”, you create a persona and a reputation for yourself that will last for years.

      Many things are done differently in the Philippines((and they surely will be different in Afghanistan). But when you use ‘code words’ such as ‘they” and make blanket pronunciations regarding the country such as “they don’t know” … the words are almost cast in stone. They will live ‘on line’ for the foreseeable future.

      As a relatively long-term resident here I think “they” know a LOT about HVAC … thank God too, as I don’t do well without it. My Philippine readership is the second highest number of folks here … it’s just sort of perhaps a silly thought of mine, but did you ever think how your words look to someone who might be thinking of hiring an HVAC technician? It would probably cause me to click on to the next applicant, myself. Also the explanation about how you only want the job for a short time certainly doesn’t inspire anyone to think about investing in you as an employee, again, in my view.

      Just some thoughts from a guy who has recruited for a lot of jobs … and again, not meant as personal criticism, just a few thoughts about the whole process of job finding, especially online.

  6. Charles C says

    Hello,

    First time to this site. I am an American who moved here on Aug 19th, 2010. I was promised a job as an English teacher. Only to find out that once I got here, one of the school sites was having trouble with Filipino tax laws and dropped out of the program. Today is Oct 6th, 2010 and I am still looking for work.

    So let me be proof that finding a job here in the Philippines is not as easy as it may have been several years ago. It doesn’t matter if you’re American or not; everyone here is starving for work.

    • Philly says

      Hello Charles. Delighted to have you aboard here. Sad that you don’t have a happier story to relate. I’ve been advising people for four years now NOT to come to the Philippines for a job … I live here, I know what’s going on here … and I know why more than half a million Filipinos a year (many of them well educated, by the way), flee the country to seek work abroad. Yet, sad to say, very few foreigners who come here bother to read and heed what I have to say. Scary

      Teaching English in the Philippines is one of the riskiest areas to pursue. There are a lot of schools here, sadly some of them fly by night as you apparently encountered, who are trying to make a ‘quick buck’ by undercutting other schools who focus mainly on Korean students. It has become a dog-eat-dog competition in some areas and the schools here depend on hiring English speaking Filipinos and the occasional foreigner who is getting hungry enough to work for less than US minimum wage.

      Living here in the Philippines there are TONS of opportunity that I see for earning money … read my series on teaching English online for example … but earning from a conventional job? I think that is a last-century idea. In most cases it just ain’t happening. Godspeed.

  7. dan says

    OK, so i was married in the Philippines and would prefer to live there. I am currenty a army soldier in the U.S. Not ear retirement. does anyone know an agency that hires soldiers. i have a secret clearance. I would like to wrok for the embassy or something of that nature.I guess i am a smart american guy looking for a good living in the philippines.any advice?

    • says

      @dan (ID 3909): Hello Dan, welcome and thanks for writing in. If you want a job making a good living in the Philippines, you better adjust your sights, becuase there isn’t much available … as I write about very often here.

      The facts of life are, the only people employing “soldiers” at the Army (and of course the Sate Department contractors in Iraq. There are State Department jobs available, again I post about them whenever they come up, but they aren’t ‘soldier’ type jobs (by the way, all the gauards and security at the US Embassy are contracted Filipinos … contracted so they don’t even get good pay and allowances by Filipino standards.

      In short you need to position yourself to have have marketable skills … what would _You_ provide to a business, how would your skills make them money? No company is in the business of providing jobs, they are in the business of making money from the least numbe rof people they can hire at the lowest possiblecosts .. so that’s your challemge.

      I’m a retired US vet, so take this straight advice without considering it a slam .. it’s just the truth that you face. The US Military is both one of the world’s best … and worst … places to learn ajob. Why the worst? becuase the military runs on fixed structures, regardless of cost. If a unit is authorized 300 mien, they are going to get staffed with (nearly) 300 men … irregardless if every one of those men really has a role or not (you know very well from personal experience, there are always soldiers who do outstanding things and there are also lazy SoB’s who only serve out their hitch, doing everything they can to escape work. And both get discharged with the same paperwork. It’s nothing like areal-world business environment.

      Civilian businesses can’t operate like that .. a company opes a branch in the Philippines let’s say. They don’t decide that there will be 300people there and start hiring to fill 300 slots. They hire a cadre and start making the manager (OIC) of that branch justify with dollars and cents every single additional hire. In some ways this sounds simplistic, so I apologize, but I get inquiries all the time from former military and soon-to-be former military folks who seem to thing there are “billets” available for someone who just cracks the code … it just doesn’t work that way, sorry.

      Read my articles on jobs, find yourself an American company who’s hiring here and best of luck to you. Or stay Army until you retire … there are many retired servicemen here, because unlike the conditions in the US, you can live on a basic military retirement here … and as an active soldier you make LOT more spendable income than you think … all the military scuttlebutt always says that you’ll make more as a civilian? But I wore the uniform for years and then worked civil service … guess what, I took home more as an E-7 than a GS-12 … my Civil Service “Gross” pay looked good on paper, but “Net”, as in money in the bank I could spend every month? I did better as an E-7. The truth is good paying jobs are not what they used to be.but real jobs? Not so easy my friend. Godspeed.

    • philip says

      I would work for a security business myself if I were you? But since you were a soldier receiving pension I supposed…. you need not work, enjoy life in there stay away from wife family who looks at you as human ATM?

  8. Dana H Hollowell says

    Hello,
    Ive been a Broadcast Engineer for the last 31yrs..I have been a vendor to the industry supplying Television stations and networks with Microwave transmission equipment..design and installtion..plus I have also worked at a Television station doing maintinace and repair..I was wondering if there would be any opportunities for me working in the Philipinnes, as I intend to more there soon..I really dont have to work but I would love to do someting productive..Best regards, Dana

    • says

      @Dana H Hollowell (ID 4708): Hello Dana, thanks for reading and for writing in. I’ve written thousands of words in answer to your question .. this article is one of them. Think it through and read some of the “related Articles” listed here.

      The short answer is, foreigners can’t work here (with of course exceptions, which I have also written about extensively). The major criterion for an exception is, having a skill or talent that can’t be provided by a Filipino. So what would that be? Broadcast engineer? Have you any idea how many TV stations (and how many staff engineers) there are in the Philippines? Answer is, a heck of a lot. So the question back in response to your question is, what would you bring to the table? What would convince an employer to certify to the Philippine government that your skills are unique and unobtainable here? Remember, Philippine citizens have the right to work here. Foreigners do not. We operate under the Philippine Constitution here, not the US Constitution.

      Now don’t take those words the wrong way, I’m not trying to insult or demean you, but I’m trying to put things into perspective.

      Could you get a job in the broadcast industry here? It’s very likely that you could. The TV industry in particular has had a large percentage of foreigners since its beginning. So if you really want to, research the major corporations, then the individual companies, find yourself some likely ‘targets” and begin selling yourself. It’s certainly not impossible, especially with your experience and background.

      I guess the part that puzzles me, though, is why a man who says he doesn’t need a job would want one? Especially in a country where the salary, if you succeed in your search, is liable to be equal to what you were earning 30 years ago, or even less. Jobs are a bad deal for people of ability and knowledge. And as we progress into the 21st century, they are even a worse deal, every year. I can fully understand the idea of doing something productive … I’m 65, technically retired, but I’ll never be “retired” in the sense of doing nothing. I’m probably a LOT more productive today than I was back in 2003 when I last held a J-O-B. And now that 2011 is here I intend to roll out several more projects, some of which may eventually employ other people who need income and something productive to do as well.

      But to me, a ‘job’ and ‘something productive’ are diametrically opposed. My advice? Start thinking outside the ‘job’ box (you might want to start with 10 Reasons You Should Never Get a Job and perhaps 10 Myths About Self-Employment and look at the opportunities that surround you today where you could put your knowledge and years of experience to use. You may be surprised.

      A a final editorial comment. I think the broadcast TV industry is on a very short lease. The industry is changing massively, in ways the senior leadership is often blind to. In electronics stores here a huge seller are various cell phones/mobile devices that bring what was formerly ‘broadcast TV’ to the user’s pocket.

      Last night I watch a top of the line broadcast TV special of the New year’s festivities in Lueneta Park, Manila. Know what a huge percentage of the show consisted of? The two famous “talents” who were hosting the show spent half or more of their time showing and commenting on the Twitter messages scrolling in on their iPads. Twitter is free and a worldwide resource. If I want to read a stream of Twitter messages, why would I need the overhead and infrastructure of the broadcast TV system to bring it to me? It’s a buggy whip factory at the turn of the 20th century, unwilling to yet realize that the Internet is the replacement for the broadcast horse and buggy.

      Or so Dave opines. Best wishes for 2011 and beyond.

  9. mike halligan says

    could a person live comfortably in the phillipines on $1500 a month American? we don’t need a big house, we don’t need boats, we don’t need anything fancy, maybe clean, drinkable water, a house that keeps out the rain, a decent beach to swim and fish, a place to meet friends and drink a beer, a place that is safe from theft and physical aggression? Electricity, television, flush toilets, cook stoves, refrigerators? is that possible. i imagine we could ride bikes, don’t think we would need cars, maybe a small motorcycle?

    • says

      @mike halligan (ID 4760): Hello Mike, thanks for finding us and for posting a comment. Certainly it’s possible, Mike. It possible for afamily to live here on a lot less than that per month, too … although I doubt most Americans want to.

      You say “a person’ but then you also say “we”. How many people are you talking about? Adults, children, both? Foreigners, Filipinos, both, etc., etc. I’ve written nearly a thousand articles, mostly on this very subject … impossible to put it all in one comment … perhaps you might want to read a few, perhaps starting with the Costs category:

      My (Phil-Am) wife and I have been living here in the Philippines for more than 4 years now, and my bank account has never been healthier … we spend on average around $1200 a month …. but costs are really the last thing you should be looking at … there’s many pros and cons about living here aside from costs that I think are more important.

      Moving here based on costs alone is, in my view, a recipe for disaster. The most important question is, why would you want to live here aside from costs? That’s the critical one only you can answer. Godspeed.

      • Scott M. says

        I can’t imagine why I would ever want to try to get work in the Philippines when I have the option of working in the US. Even more, I can’t imagine working those hours (60+ per week) for that pay. Accountants, secretaries, construction workers, mechanics, etc. all earn $50 a week, and that might be generous.

        You go to the Philippines to spend your money, not make it. Even if you open your own business, the money is on such a small scale that the headaches generally outweight the profit. Once you make your money elsewhere, you can spend it nice and slow in paradise. I’ll be living there after I make my money.

        I do have one business I just started that I am hoping will turn profitable. I bought three new Toyota taxi’s this past june.. I bought them on time, and so far I’m turning a profit. It will all depend on how much maintenance will cost on the cars over the years.

        You just don’t go there to make money. The only chance is to start your own business. If you’ve been there a few times, you know that thousands of people have already tried every idea in the world to make money. I think breaking even and enjoying your time is the best you can hope for. If I thought I could break even by living in the Philippines, I’d be there right now. Easier said than done.

        • Scott M. says

          I mean no disrespect to those that need to be in the Philippines to be with their loved ones and can’t relocate abroad. You have to do what you have to do. Maybe borrow enough money to start a franchise. However, if you have the option….make your money abroad and retire in the philippines, then come back to the US for health care later in life.

          • says

            @Scott M. (ID 4781): Thanks, Scott. I don’t mean any disrespect either, but I suppose I do sound a little too strident when I urge these folks to think farther than a “Philippine Job”.

            You make one very good point there. The idea of so many folks that they will spend 30 or 40 years thinking about and dreaming about living in the Philippines … and then someday go there (after they are old, of curse), seems a bit upside down to me. My advice is, move NOW, not later, when you are young(er), more vigorous, have much lower needs for drugs and medical attention, and see what you can do to make a good experience from it. If you wait until you’re ‘sure’ (and thus old, like me), you may find out that your health or some other uncontrollable aspect of life has canceled your chance to go.

            Because US Medicare won’t pay overseas, a great many Americans may feel more and more “pull” back to the US after they pass 65, and life’s inescapable issues of aging come into play.

        • says

          @Scott M. (ID 4780): Thanks for your valuable contribution, Scott. Indeed I’d be really interested in knowing more about your taxi business … you’re talking about one in the Philippines, correct? One thing I find very difficult for foreigners in the Philippines is transportation. Even in big cites finding a cab can be an adventure. It’s easy at times and darn difficult other times. And if you live even a few miles outside a major metro as I do, you can forget about it. No cabs cruise or rank where I live and how I would contact a company for either a regular metered ride or for an hourly or daily charter type trip? Unknown.

          There’s a lot of opportunity in transportation, I think, if properly managed and if some modern day innovations found their way into the industry. Tell us more when you can.

          One thing I don’t quite agree with in your comment is the statement: “… that thousands of people have already tried every idea in the world to make money …”

          In my experience, this is not true at all. Most people, Filipino or foreigner just want to try the same thing as everyone else is doing. Start another sari-sari store across the street from their neighbor’s sari-sari store. Open yet another internet cafe and see how low you can go on price before you go broke. I write continuously about ways to make an income here … not necessarily getting the income ‘from” the Philippines … but it’s really a labor of love, becuase very few people seem to read and think. They just seem to shrug off theidea becuase they mostly involve use of the Internet and go elsewhere looking for the secret for makig money from yet another vulcanizing shop.

          But I won’t quit.

    • philip says

      More than enough … you want to buy my house in Cabanatuan city with gated & guarded entry 24 hrs for only
      $40k. ask me pw2gcomo@yahoo.

  10. David Suits says

    Hello I don’t care about getting a job there I have been there. what i like toknow is a safe placw to retier on the Islands there thats not to big or to small and cheap and safe

    • says

      @David Suits (ID 4831): Hello David, thanks for reading and for contributing to the community here. The question you have is, however, a bit like the question, “How long is a piece of string”? There’s 7000 plus islands and everything from big cities through provinces so remote they likely won’t even see commercial electricity in our lifetime. As a military retiree myself, tops on my list would be either Angeles City or Subic/Olongapo … becuase there are veterans organizations, more infrastructure and business supporting foreigners and a wide variety of places to live.

      But although they are high on my list, I don’t live there? Why? Family, plus being closer to (but not in) Manila. So in the end, it all boils down to what would be right for you, personally. A real question to answer for yourself is, why would you want to come here in the first place? A good analysis will likely tell you a lot about what particular area is best for you.

      • Cecilio says

        Hi! Excuse me. I am not sure if I am allowed to join in your conversion because I am a native here in the Philippines. But as regards the question where David Suits wants to live here in the Philippines, I suggest that he may consider Palawan. There are nice beaches there, plenty of islands. Also he may consider Batanes. Try searching for those places on the net. i myself want to live in Batanes. Er. Sorry for interrupting I just want to be of help.

        • says

          Cecilio » Hello Cecilio, welcome and thanks for your helpful comment. Why on earth wouldn’t you not be welcome in the conversation here? In case you haven’t checked, more than half the visitors here are Filipino/from the Philippines and certainly all are welcome. Drop by any time.

          Wow, Palawan to Batanes … that’s almost about as far apart as two places can be and still be part of the Philippines. Are you familiar with the old expression for a company serving the whole Philippines? A to Z … Aparri to Zamboanga? ;-)

          Palawan is very familiar as a tourist destination, but tell us more about Batanes, why would you want to live there?

          • Cecilio says

            Wow! Batanes is really a great place. I am dreaming of having my house on a cliff overlooking the ocean and wake up every morning in a room with a view. Though the Philippines is in the tropic but, of all the places in the Philippines, Batanes is different because it’s like Ireland. It has rolling hills. I imagine life there is calm and peaceful. The people are nice and honest. They also have a museum. You can check that out on youTube.

          • says

            Cecilio » Yep, I plan to visit there someday … although I think it might be way too cold for me, but it’s a place that will be fascinating to visit.

          • Cecilio says

            BTW Philly, I bookmark this page. I read the blog “10 reasons why you should not get a job”. It reminded me of how I ditched my job as a teacher. I almost went AWOL. I was like a scene in the movie “The Blues Brothers” where one of the main characters just abandoned the taxi cab he was driving. But someone suggested that I file formal resignation. That was almost four years ago. I have been self employed since then. I have a small computer shop. I encountered many problems running this business because there were people who tried to bring me down but I prevailed. Now the competition among the shops here are stiff because there are too many of them. But I don’t give up. I would like to invest in stock and set aside for it at least P1000 or P2000 every month. I also plan to invest in myself by going back to university. I want to acquire values so that I can create values which people and corporations need. I cannot give or sell that which I don’t have so, I figure, I must get that skills and knowledge somehow one way or the other. I don’t want to be a teacher. I finish the course through a scholarship. Now, I have a profession I don’t love, a major (secondary school physics) that has no direct application in real life and a four year old Internet shop. Honestly I don’t know what to do with what I have. In addition, I also have a mild tuberculosis I acquired when I was teaching. This prevent me from applying for jobs. I was in the process of curing it when some people sabotage my business and my medication stopped. I know though that TB can be cured easily. I hope mine haven’t mutated. I have no time and money for romance, though there is a girl that I am interested in. I am supporting a 67 year old mother I am 39. My greatest fear is to die a destitute man. I am a looser but I know I can turn my life around. I just need to find the thing that I love and everything else will follow.

          • says

            Cecilio » Thanks for sharing. I’ll only comment on one of your statements. You are not a loser … UNLESS …you can declare yourself so. No one else has the right to say that about you.

            Keep moving forward. Godspeed.

      • Kevin N. says

        Philly’
        can you give me a list of the Veterans organizations and the infastructures and business organizations that are helping foreigners in the Subic Bay/ Olongapo area please thanks! This is where i plan to move to there in the philippines!

  11. Gerlie May says

    Hi I’m Gerlie May Mendoza,19 years old.Ijust want to ask if there is an oppotunity for me or a chance that I can work in America…I have a 1 year work experience,I worked in a call center for a year and handledUS account…

    • says

      @Gerlie May (ID 5605): Hello Gerlie, thanks for being a reader and for contributing here. I’m afraid I don’t have much advice to offer about jobs in the USA. As you know, the flow of jobs in the call center/BPO area is mostly _to_ the Philippines, India, Malaysia and other Asian countries, not toward the USA.

      For a Filipino to find work in the US, especially a young, single female, I’m thinking the best way to get there legally is to find a US-based company who wll sponsor you for work that requires skills that Filipinos have … such as being a native Filipino/Tagalog/Ilocana/Bisaya speaker.

      I know there are companies in the US who cater mostly to Filipinos in the US and Filipino OFW’s who do sponsor Filipinos for US work visas (H1 type visas). A couple examples are travel agencies, moving companies, expert shippiers and such. People who find a business advanatge in having Filipinos on staff to deal directly with (or sell to), Filipino clients.

      It’s up to you to research companies who do this sort of work and make yourself attractive to them as a prospective employee.

      In general, this is what does _not_ work. Telling people you ‘want a job’. That approach seldom works becuase there are millions of people in every country who ‘want a job’, and to sponsor an emplyee for a work visa will cost an American-based company money. So why would they invest in you … or any other applicant?

      Businesses don’t exist to give people work, they exist to solve problems for people, fill needs, and they hire people to help them fill those needs and thus make a profit.

      So the way to make yourself attractive to a business is to figure out what needs the business is filling for people and to ‘sell yourself’ as a prospective employee who can help them make a profit filling those needs. Godspeed.

  12. Blatt says

    Philly
    You seem quite the expert so I wanted to ask you some questions. My husband has a potential opportunity to teach in a school in Manila, I am fortunate to Work at Home for an American Company. I was concerned about two major issues, the first is crime-I have heard that crime is high and we have 3 young girls so this is a pretty big concern. The second question is the ability to have high speed internet which I would need for my job, I am certain it is available but I wanted to know if it is widely spread or if I would have to be particular about where I would live.
    Thanks

    • says

      Blatt » Welcome and thanks for leaving a comment/question. It’s a good one. So far as being an expert, I don’t know that I would ever call myself that, but I have lived here going on five years now, all of it I guess you would say “independently”, as in not connected with a foreign company or International school or agency providing benefits and a sort of “cocoon” around me as some expats are able to live.

      Crime and safety Hate to give this an answer because the first thing that happens when you make a statement regarding crime and personal/family safety is, you make a generalization, and for a certainty, all generalizations are wrong, including this one.

      But in my almost five years here in the Metro Manila area I always feel way, way safer than I did living back in the US in Colorado Springs … which is rared as a pretty ‘safe” city in itself. In fact one of the last straws that tipped my wife and my decision to sell out of our business in Colorado and make the move here was our third house burglary in the first 10 months of 2006 … we moved in November of 2006. Since we have been here in the Philippines, the total theft I have encountered is a busted padlock that was left hanging on my front gate and disappeared and a pair of old, dog-chewed flip-flops (we call them slippers) that was drying the sun against my front fence. I saw this very old beggar lady passing by and eying those slippers … had she asked for them I would have given them to her … so I suspect she might have been the culprit … if so, fine, she needed them a lot more than I did. You might want to read You are here: Home / Editorials / Is Everyone “Out To Get You” in the Philippines? Is Everyone “Out To Get You” in the Philippines? for an account of what happened when I did something very stupid with my wallet.

      I could give you a bit more informed opinion about safety issues in general if I knew where in the Philippines you are planning on living. Asking about “crime in the Philippines” is a bit like asking about ‘crime in the US”, if you don’t differentiate between, say, Beverly Hills and Watts or Shorthills, New Jersey versus Downneck Newark. I’m an older man, so naturally I have to even take what I say myself in that perspective, because one of the characteristics of aging is one tends to start idealizing the past.

      But to me, living here, is much more like my boyhood in rural New jersey 50 years ago … certainly nothing like what I see every night on “Real Policewomen of Broward County” and other such reality shows that are taped currently right on the streets of the US of A. Bottom line? I don;t think you have an issue … we can certainly talk more on that, if you’d like.

      Now hats off to you in that you have already joined the ranks of the Work At Home contingent. I get so many queries from foreigners about finding jobs here in the Philippines and I _always_ advise that people empower themselves and either build their own business on line or work for others from me … telecommuting at its finest.

      The push back I get, even in 2011 is amazing to me … people just don’t want to change with the times.

      Internet is a concern, but again, I have no idea how much a concern it will be without knowing where you will be. Internet service is widely available and often significantly cheaper than in the US. However speeds … actually I should say throughput of data … is often lacking in terms of what you may be used to in the US. Also, 90% or moe of the websites you connect to (including this one) are in the US “lower 48″.

      No matter how good the connection you have in the Philippines (or in any other Asian country), the laws of physics dictate that even photons traveling over a fiber-optic connection take a measurable time to travel 9 or 10,000 miles. Connections from this side of the Pacific are _never_ gong to be as _snappy_ as connections to the same site from within the US, and your home ISP has very little to do with that fact.

      So, yes, you must take this into consideration. But, again, this is no different than in the US. When I lived in Colorado Springs I had a very nice cable internet connection that typically delivered a ‘real’ 2Mbpss or more. My son lives 40-odd miles away from my old address in another decent-size city and he hasn’t been able to get a really decent Internet connection in the past 10 years.

      So, do as president Reagan always advised, “Trust but Verify”. Godspeed.

    • philip says

      You should be concern with your children in there with peace and order situation? Internet is much better in there…they don’t have HDTV yet in most area…. job is scare for foreigners due to state restrictions. Put up a business of your own?

  13. says

    Philly,

    Brother that is one of the BEST (most entertaining, well-written, and informative) blogs I have ever -had the pleasure- to read. Bravo!

    Your insight is right-on and it is an awesome place to recieve information…from real people. I completely agree with the whole J-O-B thing, as it is obvious -here in the States especially- from the millions of unemployeed workers, that we need more, more and more business people and entrepreneurs. I recently returned from the Philippines (I stayed for a month in an apartment in Wack Wack, around the Manila NCR and Bohol) and I can’t wait to return and begin a dual-resisdency to develop my business(es) there. I went there on a vacation/business trip. I am the Executive Publisher of the Philippines Magazine International and went there to -finally- meet my operations team, see the sights and to view printing facilities, etc.

    I returned rested and inspired, though as you’ve mentioned 1,000 times in your blogs and articles, a little discouraged now that I’m back in LA. To be frank, I was highly upset. The Philippines is much better, full of more opportunities and much safer than mass media (like my collegues) and Balikbayans (Filipino’s living in the States/Canada) had made me believe. I began investing in the project 100% from my ‘gutt feeling’ because everyone -and I mean everyone- discouraged me from dealing with the Philippines at all.

    I grew up overseas (Africa) and San Diego mainly, I was an award-winning serial-entrepreneur, but was completely burnt-out ‘doing business’ in the States; high-over head, unappreciative workers, the games you must play to get business and the life you loose build, maintain and to hold on to your wealth. I woke up one day and sold and/or dumped everything in 2006, go a kool job for The Cheesecake Factory (the largest restaurants group in the US) on the pier and sunsequently bought a boat in Marina del Rey, CA.

    Then, I stumbled on this new opportunity for the Philippines. I would like any advice for me, and my new collegues that are all looking to develop international businesses and brands, then use the cash flow to fund our new lives as expats in PH. How is it for American businessmen? What’s a good annual income to live well in PH? I have heard P1.5 Million. Though because of my business, I am working with PH Icons like Cory Quirino, Carlos Celdran and Rujo Laurel; but from your perspective, who should I be networking with in order to build a wonderful life there? Lastly, the next Issue of my magazine is The MONEY Issue, I want to showcase all the opportunities (not jobs), the beauty and the great lifestyle that PH has to offer guys and gals like us. Perhaps you would like to colaberate.

    Let me know. Cheers!
    Kareem

    • says

      Wow! Talk about a comment that made my day. I can’t possibly answer all that, but I will respond a bit in dribs and drabs as time goes on. What’s a good income here in the Philippines? Ha, as much as you can get I suppose. But seriously, one of the advantages of living here is that one can live ever so much cheaper than in the US.

      The single most depressing thing for me is the attitude of so many Filipinos that Filipinos can’t make it, and that nothing works in the Philippines, business-wise and that the only opportunities are overseas. The Philippines, as a country and a culture, needs no enemies, so many “movers and shakers” here in country spend more time talking down their own country and saying things about their fellow Filipinos more hurtful than any boorish foreigner would ever dream of. It’s depressing to go to the mall and look at the rows and rows of beauty shops that specialize in “skin whitening” treatments and watch all the mestizo actors in the commercials because if a product is desired by “white people”, or “half-white”people it _has_ to be better than something desired by the “brown massa”. Even that term, mestizo, which to me has always been a derogatory anachronism of “old school” racism is here still a term of respect or badge of honor.

      That’s a real sticking point, in my mind. How to get the Filipino to have real Filipino pride, rather than cheering on the occasional exceptional Paquio or Cherise as they themselves stand in line OFW recruiter office, trying desperately to escape their own country.

      Answers? I have none, but recognizing the problem, and speaking frankly without useless obfuscation and “delicadeza” might be a place to start. Drop by any time, Kareem, you are indeed a breath of fresh air.

      Feel free to write me at dave(at)philfaqs.com privately with your collaboration ideas or anything I can do to help … I’m hoping your magazine will be a success … if for no other reason is it would show brains, pride and money moving from the US to the Philippines instead of the opposite.

      • David J says

        Hello there,

        I happened top stumble accross this site and have read some of the posts here. The content is informative and is actually quite good. I get the perspective of the communications, althuough I must say it could be a bit more encouraging. This is not a slam to anyone at all, just observing and sharing the experience as an outsider.

        It looks as if there are several people with a sku’d view on the idea of just going to th PH to get a job and all will be ok without having the proper expectation of the culture and way of life there. I really like there myself, but there are very few that really make a lot of money from what I can see, meaning the type of money Americans are used to making in the US.

        Recently i have been considering the option to move to the PH, and have applied to sales jobs at IBM, Microsoft, and others. I wanted to get some insight here as to the situation with type of work and the pay scale. I have almost 20 years sales experience from commercial to federal in harware/software/services. Where else could I work other than a call center to maximize my earning potrential? i am primarily looking anywhere within 30 minutes of manila.

        Any feedback would be great.

        • says

          Why would you want me to encourage people to do what, in many cases, is dumb? Life is not a bowl of cherries, and expat jobs are difficult to come by in the Philippines. But I wish you only the best. There are several regular readers here who have good-paying expat-level jobs in the Philippines, so hopefully they will offer so cogent advice as well. If you find the right slot/know the right people/prepare yourself well and happen to match up with what is needed, you can do very well. Godspeed.

  14. David J says

    You have your purpose for sharing what/how you do on the site and I respect it, so please disregard my statement. Thank you very much for the feedback and good wishes; hopefully some of the others you mentioned would offer some information.

    • John Miele says

      David:

      I am one of the regulars who has an expat job here, in sales… I can tell you that finding a job will be exceedingly difficult. My sales are in the marine industry, about 20 years, like you. I can tell you that there are Director of Sales positions in Manila in the 1.5 – 2 million annual range. About 1/4 of similar jobs in the States or Europe. MOST are filled by Filipinos.

      Not trying to shoot you down or anything, but here is my perspective, using Microsoft as an example:

      Microsoft is certainly near the top of most IT salespeople’s lists as a company for which to work. Their campus here largely does several things, mostly unrelated to sales:

      a. One of many call centers for tech support.
      b. Much of their own and others’ actual BPO operations.

      I would add “c”: Selling to the local market.

      Now, Microsoft has thousands of English-speaking, educated, IT personnel from which to choose locally for functions “A” and “B”. For function “C”, LOCAL market knowledge will be essential, and there are many people to fill those jobs who are already here anyway. The local market knowledge is something that, unless you have been selling in SE Asia for a good portion of that 20 years, you are highly unlikely to possess. I say this because you would not otherwise be asking the question: You would already have a job or lead through your existing book.

      I know a few people at Microsoft, and, as a company, they tend to fill expat positions from within, when needed. It is basic economics. For sales, with your experience, they would be looking at six figures base, plus another 5 figures to move you here, just in the immediate term. Without the local connections, you would not bring sufficient value to them for consideration.

      Look at the Microsoft web site and see what is offered: Mostly accounting and finance. Why? Those positions require corporate ties to the home office.

      The reason that you see so many positions held in call centers and BPO organizations is two fold: cultural familiarity with customers (Stateside companies and their customers who demand to speak with “Americans”) and language ability (They still need people to train call center workers on slang and accents).

      Now, if you are serious, then here are my suggestions:

      1. You need to make yourself stand out from the crowd. You need to convince someone to hire you by showing that you have value that they cannot obtain locally. This is tough: The work permit process is onerous and expensive here. You had better be good and with skills in demand.

      2. Focus on positioning yourself as a “Sales Engineer” or “Computer Engineer”. MNCs typically want IT or engineering degrees in addition (oftentimes for senior management) to an MBA for technical sales.

      3. Focus on regionally (SE Asia) rather than just the RP. Most tech sales jobs will be found in Singapore or Hong Kong, with a regional focus. Why? Those are the trade and banking centers of Asia. There are many IT sales positions in China, but they typically require Mandarin fluency. Japan and Korea have language requirements and the MNCs set up local divisions to deal with those markets. These three are manufacturing centers, good for CRM sales, but language will definitely be an issue. The Philippines is hardly a leader in finance or manufacturing, and yes, there is some demand, but, quite frankly, there is little that an expat salesperson brings to the table that cannot either be sourced locally or the extra expense justified on most companies’ balance sheets.

      4. If you are still focused on the RP, start something online yourself, before you leave. Dave and many others have done so.

      In my case, my industry is very narrow and close-knit… Everyone knows everyone else. Companies hire me because of my book of business and contact, not because I am an expat. Also, worth noting: ZERO of my customers are located in the RP. For sales, I go to the other places.

      Not trying to sound like an ass or trying to bring you down, but when I said it will be tough, I was not kidding.

      • says

        Thank you John, great advice there, as always. David, please pay particular attention to John’s number one point. I’ve written several times on this very subject. The idea of “applying for a job” is essentially not going to cut it. Pick a company and, literally, “sell yourself” to them. What specific business need do they have and how do you provide a profit-enhancing solution. This article has been read by a umber of folks, but no one seems to have really grasped the point … or, let’s say, I have never heard of anyone trying the idea out .. http://philfaqs.com/philippine-jobs/dear-sir-i-want-to-find-a-job-in-the-philippines/

        In fact, right after I wrote that piece a guy emailed me and asked for help in finding a job in the Philippines? I don’t think he even read it. Another wrote me privately and said I was ‘unhelpful” because I titled the article as if it were about finding a job, but it was all about “Internet Stuf”. Hmmm.

        I guess the point that a fellow who was an “outsider” in a very, very tight business market found himself his dream job by advertising directly to the guys in that field who had hiring authority. You mean doing something like that is about “finding a job”? Yeah, I think so, anyway. Oh well ….

  15. Roger says

    Hi phil

    I am currently working in afghanistan, as a contractor. have put away a little bit of money away, I am coming this 26th Aug to get married,she currently works in dubai, working pay check to pay check. I told her we could move back to the phillipines and most likely live off my retirement check, not much $1300 a month she tells me we can live very comfertable off this. Just want your opinion, as I am 56 she is 35, I am just getting tired of work,would not mind doing some little repairs for people but nothing too much ,enought for a couple beers a day so I am not bored hehehe. I am not looking to make any kind of killing there, just enought work to kill the bordom and play golf. Just tell me I can live off this money.I do plan to buy someplace to live so we will not have any rent to pay.

    Thanks Roger

    • says

      Hello Roger, thanks for being a reader and for contributing with a momment. let me break your questions down a little here so I cna give you my thoughts clearly:

      I am currently working in afghanistan, as a contractor. have put away a little bit of money away, I am coming this 26th Aug to get married,she currently works in dubai, working pay check to pay check. I told her we could move back to the phillipines and most likely live off my retirement check, not much $1300 a month she tells me we can live very comfertable off this.

      This is a perpetual question, Roger, and one I hate to answer. Because the reality is, you could live very well in the Philippines on $1300 USD per month, or you could go absolutely broke. How much it will cost you to live here depends much more upon how you two decide to live, rather thna any magic number of dollars per month.

      t also depends dramatically on how good you both are at money management. Your assessment of her situation in Dubai is not inspiring. What I see of Filipinos returning from OFW contracts runs the whole gamut from people returning with boatloads of cash to (sadly a great many) returning not only broke … spent every dime … but deeply in debt … credit cards bills and such they ran up while working overseas.

      Only you (and your intended) can make this evaluation for yourselves .. it’s something to think about, though, because if she has no money saved after working at a good paying (by Philippine standards, anyway) job in Dubai, how much tighter are you two going to have to live when you ‘gear down’ to one person’s salary in the Philippines. Demands from her family for support are likely to be overwhelming … have you thought that through?

      Just want your opinion, as I am 56 she is 35, I am just getting tired of work,would not mind doing some little repairs for people but nothing too much ,enought for a couple beers a day so I am not bored hehehe. I am not looking to make any kind of killing there, just enought work to kill the bordom and play golf. …

      I’m unclear on what you mean by doing rpairs for people. Building trades? Appliance repair? Mechanicing? You are apparently unclear on the conditions here. ‘A’, you are not allowed to work in most cases. ‘B’., have you any idea what tradesmen, teachers, drivers etc. make? Peanuts. $5 or $6 bucks a day is a wage many Filipinos would salivate for.

      Also, assuming you find a way around the legal issues and are willing to work for Filipino wages, what makes you think you’re qualified? A great many things are done very differently here … many Westerners will say they are done ‘wrong’ as well. That point is, however, moot. No one is going to pay a “kano” to learn how to figure out Filipino plumbing or waiting or even how to find things at the hardware store. Maybe I am missing something here but your plan sounds totally unrealistic to me.

      I do plan to buy someplace to live so we will not have any rent to pay.

      You can not buy property in the Philippines. If you buy something along with your wife, you can have your name on the title and inherit it if she should die before you, aside from that you have essentially zero property rights. More importantly, the rent versus buy situation is upside down here. I’ve written about this numerous times … it’s virtually impossible to save money by buying as opposed to paying rent. So feel free to buy if that’s what you want to do, but you certainly can’t save money by buying.

      Roger, I wish you the best. Indeed, moving to the Philippines may be the best choice for you. But I urge you to investigate things a little further, because some of your assumptions may need a little reality check and some further “thinking through”. Godspeed.

      • philip says

        Hey ROger, if your girl has lots of responsibilities in the Philippines, I suggest you moved away from her family? They will not like you if you stay with them and not be a human ATM.

  16. April G. says

    Hello Philly,
    Just stumbled upon your blog by accident. I appreciate your insight and contributions from your readership — talk about hitting the nail right on head. I can relate — born and raised in one of the Visayan islands, immigrated to the US in my late teens, and completed my undergrad in one of the city colleges in NYC. I’ve been working in one of the S&P 500 companies in the midwest for the past 12 yrs and frankly getting a bit burned out with corporate politics. The Philippines has come a long way since I left 17 yrs ago. In general for the better especially for entrepreneurs. I am hopeful my accumulated savings plus collaboration with a partner will start up a small business. And of course the main reason is to live simply and healthy among friends and family.

    • says

      Thanks for stumbling in, April. And thanks do much more for sharing. Like you, politics, both corporate and the elective kind are mostly what forced me out of the US. I don’t wnat to live y remaining years in the combination of aniety and anger that so many of my fellow Americnas .. especially those in my age group, seem to think of as normal.

      My only thought regarding your uture plans? Build your business now, online and portable, rather than coming to the Philippines with a ton of savings and a dream. That often works out very poorly … and being a Filipino/former Filipino is perhaps a disadvantage … you may know the language and the ‘ropes’ a bit more, but foreigners get treated better … or at least I do … and many things that are easy for me aren’t so easy for Filipinos.

      That doesn’t mean you can’t provide jobs here and do good things for people, but my recommendation is be an OFW/migrant in reverse .. live here, earn the money elsewhere. There’s a reason the Philippines is something like 190-something on the list of 200 countries most unfriendly toward new business. Godspeed.

  17. Joe says

    Hello Phil
    I too just stumbled on your blog. Im a 56 yr American been living here in Bolinao for a yr. now. Came here thinking I was starting an Uni business(sea urchin),lol, but realized not worth the time. I’ve stayed I enjoy it here. Just live a simple life for now. House rentals cheaper then buying. Little tired of taking trikes and buses thinking of buying a van or suv. Was suprised the costs are about 30% more then US. I got my license and Ive driven here, using friends van. Its crazy but nice to have the freedom. Ive looked at employment here but your right, not worth the pay you’d get. Same with businesses, not saying somethings not out there, I just havent thought of it yet lol. I’ve got 28 yrs experience running hotels and could give a lot of advice from what I’ve seen
    here, lol but no ones beating down my door for help.
    Even though Im a newbe here I think I’ve learned alot. Think simple adjust to where you are and enjoy. I live on $1000 to $1200 a month if I want to spend more I do but try to budget. I could live comfortably on less too.
    Im not married so in a few more months I’ll have to leave the country for a day. Will probably go to malaysia for a day or 2. Then start the visa thing over again. Not sure your knowledge on visas but I just heard that if you stay over 6 months you have to get an exit visa from immigration. Do you or anyone know if thats true and whats involved?
    Well thanks for being here Ive book marked your page and will visit often!

    • says

      Sorry it took a while to get to answering this, Joe. But as you can see, I made a whole article out of it so my answers wouldn’t get buried in the comments section. Thanks for contributing.

  18. Kevin says

    Philly,

    I apologize if you have answered any of these questions, I have made an effort to read a good deal of the material available but I still feel like I need help.

    From what I can gather you left the US for the same reasons I am dying to leave… I believe there is hope for America but I am not getting any younger.

    Is starting a small business in the Philippines as dismal a prospect as it is here?

    I am 27, with experience as an independent contractor for medical devices. I am open to change and by no means expect to strike it rich. I just want to live comfortably in a society that makes sense. Maybe the Philippines is the right place to be? Any Advice?

    • says

      Hello Kevin,

      Thanks for writing in. I’ll try to answer things a little better here:

      Is starting a small business in the Philippines as dismal a prospect as it is here?

      I don’t really know how to answer that, Kevin. Starting a small business, in any country, at any time, is a high risk affair. But it far, far beats “having a job”. However, I don’t know that I would describe the outlook as “dismal” in either country. To me, especially for someone 27 years old, starting your own business is a very desirable option. But the truth is, it’s at least a hundred time harder to start one here in the Philippines than in the US. In the US, there are dozens of government and private programs to help, the rules of ownership, business structure, etc., are dirt simple, and taxes? Wow, almost every Americna who contacts me complains about US taxes … you have no idea how much worse the tax structure here in the Philippines is.

      You’ve seen me say many times that if I wanted a J*O*B, I’d be on the first fliht back to the USA. This would go double iif I wanted to start another small business. (My wife and I ran a successful small business in the USA before we moved. If I made any mistake, it was deciding to wind it down and sell off assets before the move. I could have, perhaps should have kept it operating and managed it from here … I’ve written about this often.

      My view is, starting a business in the US is way, way easier than starting one here (not to mention the fact there are so many businesses here in the Philippines that foreigners are not allowed to own).

      …I am 27, with experience as an independent contractor for medical devices. …

      This statement confuses me … a “contractor for medical devices”. Are you a salesman, a service tech, an operator, or? My thought is, as an independent contractor you are already 90% “into” your own business. My second thought is, with a hundred thousand new Babyboomers per month, there has never been a better time to invest effort in the healthcare industry. Start a business in the US and hen move to the Philippines, that’s my advice. Godspeed. Have you read this article and the follow-ons? http://philfaqs.com/live-there/phils-business/online-business-philippines-no-english-teaching-allowed/

  19. Punglao says

    Hi Philly, I am a US Army retired and I know some has ask you questions about living in the PI. I don’t want a job in the PI or start a business. All I want to know if I move to the PI (Makati) and start out with $10,000 in cash followed with my retirement pay, will I make it or not? I read a lot of the do and don’ts and I have a girl friend who works there (not in the bars) I love the beaches and golfing. I just want to start a family and live conformable in Makati. I am open for any suggestions you have on or about living in the PI.

    • says

      Hi Punglao,

      Oh thank goodness. A comment from someone not looking for a job, starting a business or trying to wreak vengeance. A refreshing change ;-)

      The answer to your question, though, is completely within yourself (and witing your relationship with your lady). Of course you can live in the Philippines on Army retirement pay (which, of course varies a whole hell of a lot, but whatever, it can be done).

      Millions upon millions of Filipinos live on much less. Including in Makati.

      Now, how well can the two of you manage? Only you can answer … I have no idea how much you will want to spend on a place to live, how much you’ll spend on food, dining out, shopping, whatever. I have no idea how you and she mange your budget now .. do you live payday yo payday, do you save, do you have investments and so on. But yes it can certainly be done. Godspeed.

      • Punglao says

        Hi Philly,

        Thank you again for answering my questions. Reading you web site you seem to have a lot of experience living in the PI. I have more questions and I feel you are the best person to seek for answers. I have decided to live in the PI and I will like to know what are the first steps/requirements to do to live in the PI. Example, do I need to see the U.S. embassy to ask permission, do I apply for a visa, just what do I need to do? Thank you again, I wait for your reply.
        Punglao

    • philip says

      i am in the states for 30 yrs, i know philippines in and out. your $10k wont get you a decent house.
      Becoming a human ATM you will be soon as you let your girl controls you.

  20. rob rivera says

    Hi guys, great site phil. lots of useful non-sugar coated advice for people interested in moving to philippines. im a 35 year old filipino/american born and raised in the california. ive been going back n fourth to manila for the last couple years as ive met a girl there and have fallen in love with her. i divide my time in half for being in manila during winter months and leave during typhoon season to enjoy the summers in california and hawaii. living in the philppines is like the wild wild west where it is almost lawless in some sense. as a foreigner you have to be very cautious of your surroundings especially in the city areas where you stick out like a sore thumb. im filipino, but they can still tell that im not from there so i dont stick out as much, but i still have to watch out. luckily nothing has ever happened. for the most part the people are very nice and very hospitable. im considering living there more months out of the year since the cost of living is much less, but you do give up a lot of the luxuries of life that the us offers that most americans take for granted like clean air, less traffic, diversity, the ability to make a better living for yourself, safety, less mosquitos, the availability of pretty much anything you want for a cheaper price like electronics (tv’s computers, cameras), certain foods, etc. but living/housing expenses are quite cheaper there. if you are not picky you can eat cheap local meals for about $2. you can have a live in maid for around $100/month that cooks, cleans, and does laundry. you can have a driver for around $200/month to drive you through all the traffic. so it’s really a give and take.

    anyways, how i survive is i have a business that i run where i sell credit card service to businesses in the US. i offer to save them money on their credit card service fees and then sign them up for our service if they are interested. the best part about the business is that we make a small % of their credit card sales volume month after month for as long as they use our service. so the residual income is what allows me to have the freedom to leave for long periods of time and still make money even if im there. its somewhat a sales job, but more of consulting the business owner and educating them about the credit card service industry and how our pricing model is the best way for them to save money. its not a get rich quick scheme or business, its something that takes time to build your portfolio of clients, but the reward of freedom to control your time and own your life is the best part about it. if you guys are interested in learning more about this business, feel free to message me and i can send you more information about it, and if youre serious, im willing to train people that are willing to put the time and effort into making calls to business owners in the us. its something great to do on the side or full time until you start making enough to where you can survive off your residuals. i know there are a lot of retired americans in the philippines looking for something to do on their free time and this would be great. but keep in mind if you are in the philippines, you will have to be up at night making calls during business hours in the us. feel free to message me if you are interested. thanks, rob here’s my email: [email protected]

    • says

      Hi Rob,

      Thanks for writing in and contributing so much. I’m going to repost it here, broken up with a few of my own comments:

      Hi guys, great site phil. lots of useful non-sugar coated advice for people interested in moving to philippines.

      im a 35 year old filipino/american born and raised in the california. ive been going back n fourth to manila for the last couple years as ive met a girl there and have fallen in love with her. i divide my time in half for being in manila during winter months and leave during typhoon season to enjoy the summers in california and hawaii.

      A very good plan, by the way. here on Luzon, where ther is a pronunced rainy/storm season in the summer, a great plan is to go back to the USA in May, when it gets smoking hot and then stay until it starts to get cold in the USA, say October, when the weather is getting perfect here in the Phils.

      living in the philppines is like the wild wild west where it is almost lawless in some sense. as a foreigner you have to be very cautious of your surroundings especially in the city areas where you stick out like a sore thumb. im filipino, but they can still tell that im not from there so i dont stick out as much, but i still have to watch out. luckily nothing has ever happened.

      I constantly try to tell people that you make yourself a target when you try to operate a business in the Philippines as aforeigner. You don’t have to be an “Ugy Americna”, you don’t have to be in any kind of a shady business, all you have to do is stick your head up.

      I’m “in business”, but NOT business in the Philippines. The only part of my business that ‘shows” is the little Internet antenna on my roof that everyone else on my block has too ;-)

      for the most part the people are very nice and very hospitable. im considering living there more months out of the year since the cost of living is much less, but you do give up a lot of the luxuries of life that the us offers that most americans take for granted like clean air, less traffic, diversity, the ability to make a better living for yourself, safety, less mosquitos, the availability of pretty much anything you want for a cheaper price like electronics (tv’s computers, cameras), certain foods, etc. but living/housing expenses are quite cheaper there (the Philippines).

      if you are not picky you can eat cheap local meals for about $2. you can have a live in maid for around $100/month that cooks, cleans, and does laundry. you can have a driver for around $200/month to drive you through all the traffic. so it’s really a give and take.

      A nice perspective from both the Filipino and American side of the house all rolled into one.

      anyways, how i survive is i have a business that i run where i sell credit card service to businesses in the US.

      i offer to save them money on their credit card service fees and then sign them up for our service if they are interested.

      the best part about the business is that we make a small % of their credit card sales volume month after month for as long as they use our service. so the residual income is what allows me to have the freedom to leave for long periods of time and still make money even if im there.

      its somewhat a sales job, but more of consulting the business owner and educating them about the credit card service industry and how our pricing model is the best way for them to save money. its not a get rich quick scheme or business, its something that takes time to build your portfolio of clients, but the reward of freedom to control your time and own your life is the best part about it.

      if you guys are interested in learning more about this business, feel free to message me and i can send you more information about it, and if youre serious, im willing to train people that are willing to put the time and effort into making calls to business owners in the us.

      its something great to do on the side or full time until you start making enough to where you can survive off your residuals. i know there are a lot of retired americans in the philippines looking for something to do on their free time and this would be great. but keep in mind if you are in the philippines, you will have to be up at night making calls during business hours in the us.

      feel free to message me if you are interested. thanks, rob here’s my email: [email protected]

      When I first saw this my initial thought was, “Oh no, Rob’s taking too much advantage of free advertising here, and I was going to delete a lot of it.

      Then I re-read it and went and looked at the website of Rob’s company and I find that it all looks on the up-and-up. Bear in mind I do not know Rob or his company so I don’t recommend them, but I can usually smell the stink of a scam from a thousand miles away and this doesn’t stink. But, as with any business venture, caveat emptor.

      It’s a bitch to get a small business in the USA set up to accept credit cards, I know this from personal experience, so helping small business owners get themselves credit card capable can’t be all that bad of a gig. And this is certainly a business you can work at and earn from either in the USA or in the Philippines, something so many of you tell me you are vitally interested in.

      • rob rivera says

        thanks philly for breaking down my post more and adding input.

        yes youre right, i didnt say it was an easy task to get business owners to switch their credit card service, but when you do get them to, the rewards pay you financially for years to come. that’s why it isnt for everyone, especially the people that give up easily, or the ones the want to make lump sums of money up front right away, or the ones that cant handle the repetition of making 100’s of calls a day (most of which you are rejected)

        this is something I’ve been doing since 1998 and i’ve never worked a real job, so im used to it and i love my life and the freedom that it allows me to have. if i dont want to work today, i dont have to, but i work because i want to and because im already enjoying the benefits of the portfolio i’ve built. I dont mind sharing my knowledge with fellow american expats that want to do something for themselves. but the key word is that they “want” to do it. im busy enough as it is and dont want to really waste time teaching people that are not serious about it, but if i can see that someone really has the desire to do it then i dont mind. that’s what someone did for me many years ago when i had no experience, but had the strong desire to to it, so now i feel that it’s my turn to do the same for others.

        great site by the way. ive added it to my favorites and will read more of your articles. Im leaving california on halloween and stopping by hawaii for a few nights then off to manila for some warm tropical weather for the holidays!

  21. Jerry says

    Hi Phil,

    I definitely appreciate all of your input and your dedication to this blog. I am a young man in my early 30’s. I left a very specialized job in research in which I have more than 10 years of experience. I do not have a PhD and have no desire on pursuing one with the US economy how it is and funding getting pulled out every day. I feel type-casted here and don’t really see too many opportunities for me anymore. I plan to make a career change and starting a business seems to be my only out. Within the same 10yrs, I also spent time promoting and producing events at night clubs on the side, which led to me becoming a booking agent for a large network of promters in Asia, Australia and New Zealand. I have been given the opportunity to buy into an already successful night club in the Philippines and a start-up restaurant with 2 other ex-pat partners. I have a good feeling that they both will be successful, especially with the network I have built there. I have been traveling back and forth to the Philippines almost every year in the past 11 years and see nothing but progress. I also feel like the global economy has already moved to Asia and will continue to do so in the coming years. I am currently debt free. I have no wife, no mortgage, no car payments. Do you think this would be a wise idea? I don’t see anything for me in the US anymore. Any input would be greatly appreciated. Thank you so much for your time.

  22. John says

    What about jobs for Americans in call centers or any outsourced companies? Do you have any insight?

  23. Terry M says

    Dear Philly,
    I am retired from the United States Navy, and now I am retiring from a California County Public Service job. Thus I shall receive pensions from two seperate entities. I am very interested in “Hammock Comfort Consulting”, as well as “San Miguel Beer Unofficial Taste Tester”. Should you run into anything like these, please e-mail me when you find the time.
    Thanks
    Terry

    • says

      I’ll keep my eyes open for you, Terry. Be happy to eamil you my findings right away. meanwhile, don’t work so hard, ake a rest ;-)

  24. Anthony says

    Hello.
    Im a 21 yr old thinking of moving to the Philippines on my own.
    Is it a good idea? I would study there asap, but getting a job is what concerns me.
    Any tips? Should I wait a few more years till I finish studying?

    • says

      Hello Anthony,

      Thanks for writing in. Your “plan” sounds pretty shaky to me at first bluish, but maybe there is more to it.

      Tell me a few things. What is your citizenship? What do you plan to live on, funds-wise? What will you study? Have you read any of my articles here, especially this one?

      http://philfaqs.com/live-there/working/10-reasons-you-dont-want-a-job-in-the-philippines/

      There are about 100,000,000 million Filipinos here, most of whom can not find job, or who have to take jobs that are way below what they qualify for just to try to feed their family.

      Nearly a million Filipinos a year mortgage their future and flee the Philippines in order to take jobs overseas. Even if it is cleaning toilets or construction laboring, it will pay more than they can make here. These are, sadly, often the country’s “best and brightest”. Those who can’t escape are stuck here.

      It is extremely unrealistic, in my personal opinion, for a young man to come here and expect to make it, especially if his goal is “getting a job”. Jobs are an anachronism of the last century. There’s no future in them. I don’t recommend them to anyone. Godspeed.

  25. David De Witt says

    Interested in moving to the Philippines…the Tagaytay area of Manila…in need of a job… I am an American, I speak English only but have over 20 years as a computer technician working for major companies like Heinz, Verizon, Speedway, Krogers…If anything come up….let me know…I can also forward my resume to you…thank you…dave

    • says

      David, good day and thanks for writing in. A couple observations on your “plan”. Short and sweet, it’s unrealistic:

      1. Tagaytay is not in anyway part of Manila. It’s several hours away by road, and way worse on weekends when there is traffic. It’s not a place where there are jibs at all, really. It’s a well-to-do resort area.

      2. read the following. I know, I know, reading is a big task, some people even get pissed when I tell them to read up on what they are planning to do, but learning the facts might help you avoid committing financial suicide:

      http://philfaqs.com/live-there/working/10-reasons-you-dont-want-a-job-in-the-philippines/

      search here for an idea of what is available:

      http://philfaqs.com/philippine-jobs-for-foreigners/

      There are many more articles regarding foreigners and jobs in the Philippines I have written here. You’d be well advised to read more of them as well.

      3. Having a skill of a “computer technician” is very vague to me. Rest assured, though, that the Philippines is absolutely full of degreed computer techs and engineers, working as cab drivers or janitors or un-employed. In fact “computer’ and “IT” degrees are one of the biggest categories of degrees I see people studying here, and there are no where near enough jobs for them. What college degrees do you hold? They carry a very big weight here, you typically need a bachelor’s degree to work as a store sales clerk for example.

      4. What you know from the US may not directly apply here. Many things in business, computer networking,even answering the phone are different here, you can not just waltz in and expect to be competitive. Also, as a guy who spent years hiring and approving computer professionals for government contracts, do your self a favor and figure out a way to present your work experience better. As it reads right now, the first thing that comes to my mind is, “This guy must be a malcontent who can’t hold a job at one company”. Unfair? Perhaps, but that’s the impression you are leaving by name dropping all those companies. The key to getting a job is not what you know, it is what you can do for your employer. What problems can you solve now, not what you did 20 years ago. Age discrimination is also very much alive and well here in the Philippines and you sound too old. It is totally legal here to reject people based on age … or almost any other whim a company may have. When you come here, you are “not in Kansas anymore”.

      Think this thing through. Coming her to “get a job’ is a shaky thing at best. Unlike the US where there are thousands of benefits and helping agencies, this is a very, very bad country to be poor in. Godspeed.

  26. Bradlee Dwyer says

    Hi my name is Bradlee Dwyer and I am currently living here in cebu city… I have my bachelors degree in business admin/business math… I currently am needing a job to survive here as I have nothing to go home to and I have nobody to help me. Pls send anybody my way to my email and i would be so happy to send out a resume. I can work anywhere in the world or the philippines as long as i can be transferred and would do a great job for anybody if they just give me that chance. ty for your time and have a nice day..

  27. Joshua says

    My family owned a transport company here in the USA. What Americans need to know is. I have contractors in Manila, Philippines that work 10-12 hours a day 5-6 days per week and I pay them VERY WELL accordingly to their economy. FILIPINO’s average @ $2500.00usd per year or 100,000pesoa? I pay 2x that amount. And my profits are not that great! I pay the average Filipino $20-25usd per DAY!
    MILLIONS ARE HOMELESS, Yes MILLIONS! Just because you are Americanin the Philippines? You will not make crap in pay! You willnot work up to 100hrs a week either! According to my Contractors, I pay the. BEST! Time off and bonuses!

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