Actions Speak Louder Than Words

‘Habitat for Humanity’ goes on recruitment drive

By Tarra Quismundo
MANILA, Philippines–It takes no expert to pile blocks, drive nails or paint walls, just the heart to make time to rebuild lives one by one.

Seeking to enlist more volunteers for a noble mission, international humanitarian organization Habitat for Humanity is going on a road trip to typhoon-ravaged Bicol this September for a volunteer build, an event that hopes to add hundreds more to its roster of goodwill servants…. read the rest oi Tarra’s excellent article here:

Just recently I posted some thoughts on what to do to help the helpless.  The “Paradise Merchants” don’t like it when some of us more honest bloggers tell the truth about living in the Philippines, but I certainly always will.

The truth is there are poor people here.  Another truth is, there are damaging tropical storms every year (a typhoon by the way is the same thing as a major hurricane, like Katrina … many westerners seem to have it confused with something lie a tornado, I have found).  A good place to watch hurricanes, typhoons and tropical storms world-wide, without a lot of hype is here, courtesy of the University of Hawaii … it is one of the few I have ever found that lets me keep track world-wide at a glance.



Anyway, in the US, the current leadership has spent more than a year spending billions to rebuild the beach homes of prominent Republican leaders while the poor people in New Orleans get told, relocate and find a job.  Here in the Philippines we do it a little different.

Habitat For Humanity is a great world-wide organization who builds homes for poor and displaced people.  it is Christ-centered but it’s not a church, so you don’t want to discount their ideas based on religious preferences.  A number of US presidents have endorsed it, Jimmy Carter has even been here building in the Philippines, hands-on,and, to his credit the current White House occupant has swung a hammer for Humanity, so it’s non-partisan.  Unlike government giveaway programs of any description, a large part of HfH’s success has been due to the fact that although the recipients of their house are disadvantaged folks, the occupants have to make some sort of down payment … even with sweat equity work … and the dwellings have low-interest financing which must be paid in order to fund further HfH projects.

So, who wants to take a trip to Bicol?